3 Indian-origin women scientists selected as Australia’s STEM Superstars: Report

Technology3 Indian-origin women scientists selected as Australia's STEM Superstars: Report
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Three Indian-origin women are among 60 scientists, technologists, engineers and mathematicians selected as STEM Superstars in Australia. This information was given in a media report on Wednesday. STEM is an initiative that aims to break down society’s gendered stereotypes about scientists and increase the public visibility of women and genderqueer people.

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The country’s top body in the field of science and technology, ‘Science and Technology Australia’ (STA) has brought 60 Australian experts working in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) to the media headlines, The Australia Today reported. Supports to come and become a public idol. STA represents 1,05,000 scientists and people associated with the technology sector.

Three Indian-origin women – Neelima Kadiala, Dr. Ana Baburamani and Dr. Indrani Mukherjee – are among those recognized as STEM Superstars this year. An IT Program Manager at ‘Challenger Limited’, Kadiala has over 15 years of experience in delivering large scale transformational programs across multiple industries including Financial Services, Government, Telco and FMCG. It was said in the news that she came to Australia in 2003 as an international student to study ‘Master of Business in Information Systems’.

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Baburamani, on the other hand, is a Scientific Advisor in the Department of Defense – Science and Technology Group and is always keen to work on how the brain grows and functions. According to the news, “As a biomedical researcher, she seeks to piece together the complex process of brain development and the mechanisms that contribute to brain trauma.” She received her doctorate from Monash University and has worked as a research scholar in Europe for 10 years.

Mukherjee is a ‘deep time’ geologist at the University of Tasmania and focuses on what drove that biological transition. She is working as a researcher in Tasmania, as well as in the areas of public relations, geology communication and diversity initiatives. Apart from Indians, women scientists from Sri Lanka have also been selected for this.

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Credit: bharat.republicworld.com /

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